Alaska Seafood Health & Nutrition
Healthy lifestyles begin with Alaska Seafood

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Wild Alaska Nutrition Values

Wild Alaska Nutrition Values
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Alaska Seafood Nutrition Benefits

Alaska Seafood Nutrition Benefits
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Alaska Seafood Nutrition Resources

Alaska Seafood Nutrition Resources

Wild Alaska Nutrition Values

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Wild Alaska Salmon

  Alaska King Alaska King Salmon Alaska Coho Alaska Coho Salmon Alaska Sockeye Alaska Sockeye Salmon Alaska Keta Alaska Keta Alaska Pink Alaska Pink Salmon
Calories 200 120 130 130 130
Protein (g) 22 20 23 22 21
Fat (g) 11 4 5 4 4
Saturated Fat (g) 3 1 1 1 1
Sodium (mg) 50 50 80 55 75
Cholesterol (mg) 70 50 50 80 50
Omega-3s
DHA+EPA (mg)
1476 900 730 683 524
Vitamin B12 (mcg) 2.4 4.3 3.8 2.9 4
Vitamin A (mcg) 130 40 50 30 40
Vitamin D (mcg) NA 9.6 14.2 NA 11
Selenium (mcg) 40 32 30 40 32
Potassium (mcg) 430 370 370 470 370
Iron (mg) 0.8 0.5 0.4 0.6 0.4
Calcium (mg) 20 40 10 10 7

Cooked, 3 oz./ 85 g | Source: USDA Standard Reference Release 28 | Rounded per FDA guidelines

Wild Alaska Canned Salmon

 

Alaska Sockeye (traditional)

Alaska Sockeye (skinless, boneless)

Alaska Sockeye (no salt)

Alaska Pink (traditional)

Alaska Pink (skinless, boneless)

Alaska Pink (no salt, contains liquid)

Alaska Keta (traditional)

Alaska Keta (no salt)

Calories 140 130 130 120 120 120 120 120
Protein (g) 20 22 17 20 21 17 18 18
Fat (g) 6 5 6 4 4 5 5 5
Saturated Fat (g) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Sodium (mg) 350 330 65 320 320 65 330 65
Cholesterol (mg) 70 55 40 70 70 45

35

35
Omega-3s
DHA+EPA (mg)
1077 965 982 916 812 1403 999 999
Vitamin B12 (mcg) 4.7 4.7 NA 4.2 4.2 3.7 3.7 3.7
Vitamin A (mcg) 50 50 50 20 20 10 20 20
Vitamin D (mcc) 17.8 18.3 NA 12.3 14.1 NA 8.2 NA
Selenium (mcg) 29 29 30 34 34 28 37 37
Potassium (mcg) 270 270 320 280 280 280 260 260
Iron (mg) 0.6 0.4 0.9 0.7 0.5 0.7 0.6 0.6
Calcium (mg) 200 30 200 240 50 180 210 210

Cooked, 3 oz./ 85 g | Source: USDA Standard Reference Release 28 | Rounded per FDA guidelines

Alaska Whitefish

  Alaska Cod Alaska Cod Alaska Halibut Alaska Halibut Alaska Pollock Alaska Pollock Alaska Rockfish Alaska Rockfish Alaska Sablefish Alaska Sablefish Alaska Sole Alaska Sole Alaska Lingcod Alaska Lingcod Alaska Herring Alaska Herring
Calories 70 90 70 90 210 70 90 210
Protein (g) 17 19 17 19 15 13 19 18
Fat (g) 0 1 0 1 17 2 1 15
Saturated Fat (g) 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3.5
Sodium (mg) 115 70 140 75 60 90 65 80
Cholesterol (mg) 50 50

65

50 55 50 60 85
Omega-3s
DHA+EPA (mg)
70 201 281 293 1519 255 224 1807
Vitamin B12 (mcg) 1.6 1.1 3.1 1.4 1.2 1.1 3.5 8.2
Vitamin A (mcg) NA 20 10 4 90 10 10 30
Vitamin D (mcg) 0.4 5.0 1.1 3.9 NA 3.0 NA NA
Selenium (mcg) 24 47 38 65 40 28 40 40
Potassium (mcg) 320 450 310 400 390 170 480 460
Iron (mg) 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 1.4 0.2 0.4 1.2
Calcium (mg) 10 10 10 10 40 20 20 90

Cooked, 3 oz./ 85 g | Source: USDA Standard Reference Release 28 | Rounded per FDA guidelines

Alaska Shellfish

  Alaska King Crab Alaska King Crab Alaska Snow Crab Alaska Snow Crab Alaska Dungeness Crab Alaska Dungeness Crab Alaska Shrimp Alaska Shrimp Alaska Scallops Alaska Scallops Alaska Geoduck Alaska Geoduck Alaska Razor Clam Alaska Razor Clam Alaska Sea Urchin (Roe) Alaska Sea Urchin Alaska Sea Cucumber Alaska Sea Cucumber
Calories 80 100 90 80 90 70 130 120 45
Protein (g) 16 20 19 20 17 15 22 15 11
Fat (g) 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 7 0
Saturated Fat (g) 0 0 0 0 0 NA 0 NA NA
Sodium (mg) 910 590 320 95 570 260 1020 65 NA
Cholesterol (mg) 45 60 65 160 35 30 60 266 NA
Omega-3s
DHA+EPA (mg)
351 405 335 26 149 NA 241 NA NA
Vitamin B12 (mcg) 9.8 8.8 8.8 NA 1.8 NA NA NA NA
Vitamin A (mcg) 10 40 30 NA 2 NA 145 NA 260
Vitamin D (iu) NA NA NA NA 2 NA NA NA NA
Selenium (mcg) 34 38 41 NA 18 NA 54 NA NA
Potassium (mcg) 220 170 350 220 270 NA 530 NA NA
Iron (mg) 0.7 2.5 0.4 0.4 0.5 NA 2.4 NA 0.5
Calcium (mg) 50 30 50 60 8 70 80 NA 30

Cooked, 3 oz./ 85 g | Source: USDA Standard Reference Release 28 | Rounded per FDA guidelines

Alaska Seafood Nutrition Benefits

Alaska seafood is a key source of marine omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) which are essential for our bodies to promote heart health, suppress inflammatory responses, improve blood flow and participate in brain function. Alaska seafood is also naturally high in many essential vitamins and minerals including vitamins E, A, D and B-12. Alaska seafood provides a complete, high-quality protein keeping muscles and bones strong and healthy.

“Seafood is rich in protein and other important nutrients, like B vitamins, selenium and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.”
Rima Kleiner, MS, RD, LDN

 

Heart Health and Alaska Seafood

Alaska seafood benefits the heart in many ways. Regularly eating fatty fish reduces the inflammatory substances produced in the heart’s arteries, improving their function.

Heart Blood Pressure Omega-3s
 

Healthy Moms and Babies and Alaska Seafood

Several key nutrients for mothers, such as selenium and iodine, are abundant in Alaska seafood. One occurs in seafood almost exclusively—the omega-3 fatty acid DHA.

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Mental Health and Alaska Seafood

Omega-3s found in Alaska seafood are linked to sharper brain function, cognition and memory that give you a mental edge.

Omega-3s Brain Health

Alaska Seafood Nutrition Resources

Heart Health

  • An analysis of 20 studies involving hundreds of thousands of participants indicates that eating a modest consumption of fish (1-2 servings/wk), especially species higher in omega 3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, reduces risk of coronary death by 36% and total mortality by 17%.
  • Evidence continues to emerge to further substantiate the beneficial effects of seafood long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. A recent review by the American Heart Association continues to recommend eating fish twice a week for a healthy heart.

For more information on heart health and seafood consumption see:

Mayo Clinic – Omega 3 in fish: How eating fish helps your heart

American Heart Association – Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acid

Mental Health

  • Studies have shown that consumption of fish, and the subsequent increases to EPA and DHA levels in the blood, have been increasingly linked to lowering the risk and incidences of various mental health afflictions including Alzheimer’s, dementia, and general cognitive decline. Omega-3’s promotion of new brain cell growth, anti-inflammatory properties, role in the clearing of amyloid plaques (a signifier of Alzheimer’s), and general improvements to gray matter volume, and cognitive function all play a role in these protective effects, and even greater protections may be offered to at-risk individuals.
  • Additionally, diets high in seafood have been shown to reduce symptoms in individuals suffering depression, due to DHA and EPA’s anti-inflammatory properties and promotion of serotonin production and absorption, as well as the naturally occurring tryptophan (which is a precursor to serotonin). Seafood is also a rare food in that it naturally contains Vitamin D, a known factor in promotion of mental health.

Healthy Moms, Prenatal Health, and Child Development

  • DHA is gathered in the brain during pregnancy and in early infancy through breastmilk. Half of the brain’s DHA accumulates during pregnancy, accumulating at 30-45 mg per day in the last trimester. Increased intake of DHA by the mother supplies a larger amount to the fetus and leads to higher DHA concentration in cord blood or infant blood levels. Studies have shown a higher DHA supply to the fetus during pregnancy and to the infant after birth provides maximum benefits on the development of visual acuity, cognitive functions and attention, the maturity of sleep patterns, spontaneous motor activity, healthy social behavior, and immunity.
  • In addition, being pregnant or giving birth can precipitate postpartum depression in some women. Perinatal depression can result in psychosocial dysfunction, suicide, and adverse childcare. Increased rates of depression are found in women who have an inadequate amount of omega-3 in their blood as omega-3 fatty acids affect neurotransmission and deficiency creates neuro-inflammation in the brain. This can be exacerbated by the fetus/infant’s high intake of DHA from the mother during pregnancy and breastfeeding, which drains the omega-3’s available for her own body to use. Research has demonstrated an increased presence of omega-3 fatty acids in a woman’s diet may attenuate maternal psychosocial stress and reduce rates of depression by supporting a positive mood and altering perceived stress and anxiety.
  • Seafood consumption during pregnancy has been linked to positive outcomes for neurocognitive development in children from infancy all the way through adolescence. According to a recent systematic review, test scores (verbal, visual, and motor skill development, IQ, scholastic achievement, hyperactivity, and ADHD) of children whose mothers consumed seafood during pregnancy scored better on some or all tests administered, with benefits manifesting on tests as early as three days of age and as late as 17 years. Studies tracking IQ points found that children of mothers who consumed seafood during pregnancy had an average IQ 7.7 points higher than those whose mothers did not, and hyperactivity was 3 times more likely to occur in children of non-seafood eaters. Benefits were present even for children whose mothers who consumed lower amounts of seafood, and no adverse impacts were observed in those whose mothers consumed the highest amount, meaning that any mercury present had no negative neurocognitive impact. It was concluded that the nutrients offered by seafood as a whole food, including zinc, iron, choline, folate, iodine, selenium, vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids offer a brain boost which far exceeds any concerns regarding mercury, and mercury bound in a seafood behaves very differently in the human body than mercury in isolation due to these other factors present.

Seafood Nutrition Partnership

The Seafood Nutrition Partnership raises awareness about the essential nutritional benefits of eating seafood.
http://www.seafoodnutrition.org

Seafood Health Facts

The latest in seafood nutrition and health benefits for consumers and health care providers.
http://seafoodhealthfacts.org.